Welcome to Option Solving (for dealing with your Decision Dilemmas) -also see latest examples below…and many more.

 

See below, “Peeling the Onion: What is my optimum professional office option?”  At our next blog in two weeks time, we will deal with: “What is our best option for a home room rental?”  Also, go to http://www.youtube.com and type in Option Solving and go for the 1 min 48 sec version: this will refer you to OSOLing (Option Solving On-line: a virtual way to deal with your Dilemmas)READ ABOUT THE INTERESTING, WIDE-RANGING APPLICATIONS BELOW: including the latest blog. Go to SUBSCRIBE email-to your left, if you want regular notification of blog updates.

Read the book, Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options. And visit the author’s main website at www.ileadershipsolutions.com

Peter Arthur-Smith, Originator of Option Solving

Peter Arthur-Smith, Originator of Option Solving

Daniel H. Pink, author of business best seller “A Whole New Mind”, with new book “Drive” says, “Peter Arthur-Smith has produced a savvy and practical book that will change how you approach the challenges in your business. By showing you the limits of ‘problem-solving’ and the power of whole-minded thinking. SMART DECISIONS will expand your strategies and widen your possibilities.”

Peeling the Onion: Optimal professional office option- Option F: “Bring in a professional CEO to run practice, turn it around – I just remain Owner and Practice:” using Option Solving?

Our last option solving challenge dealt with a professional friend who is experiencing business and growth difficulties and wants to figure out his best course of action in the circumstances.  At that point he chose option E- “Bring in a professional CEO to run the practice.” This brought him an opportunity to utilize Peeling the Onion to figure out his sub-optimal approach for doing this.

Already being fully aware of the technique, he set about producing a new question: “What is our best approach to utilizing a professional CEO: considering 1) will be initially disruptive to practice, 2) as owner will have to possibly play second-fiddle, 3) insure CEO pays for self, and 4) CEO have right incentive to make it work?” There were other considerations, but he felt it was best to stick with four new ones, without overly complicating this secondary approach.

Again he produced two “bookend” choices to serve as his new yin and yang extreme possibilities. They would enable his intuitive mind to focus on his most realistic set of options. The bookends he selected this time were: “Not do it” and “Owner bail-out of practice at earliest point,” both of which he felt were again least probable outcomes. Since our intuitive minds can so easily be distracted, bookends help keep them on track and focused – see our Latest Worked Example.

He now had to produce at least five realistic options to again stretch his mind- options to an optimal degree – you will see he produced six.  Look at our Latest Example and you will see those six options, one of those proposed was: “Option C – Owner &CEO act as co-CEOs – agree on weekly objectives.”

With this new “pictogram” now in place, indicating all six options, it was now time for him to engage in further emotional distancing. Emotional distancing would allow his intuitive mind to sub-consciously ponder his six options, now they were all in place. It will also enable him to be more objective when he returned to this pictogram to make his optimum choice. Once he made that choice, it would be important for him to stick with it and create an associated action initiative, while it is still fresh in his mind. He could of course go through a Peeling the Onion cycle again as a means of fleshing out a further tactical approach toward resolving his practice re-imagining issue.

Which sub-option would you have chosen, if you were in his shoes?

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two weeks time: “What is our best option for a home room rental?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

What is my optimal professional office option: using Option Solving?

A professional friend is experiencing business and growth difficulties and wants to figure out his best course of action in the circumstances. Fortunately, he was already aware of the option solving approach, so we were able to get right to it.

He promptly set about  producing a rational question to spark possible options, which turned out to be: “What is my optimal professional office option: considering 1) local demographics have changed, 2) Great Recession still has lingering impact, 3) staff are borderline, and 4) beginning to think about retirement?” He came up with other considerations, but felt it was best to stick with four key ones, without overly complicating his ultimate decision dilemma.

We immediately got him to produce two “bookend” choices to serve as his yin and yang extreme possibilities. These would hem-in his intuitive mind to concentrate on his most realistic set of options. The bookends he selected were: “Just let office fritter away” and “Find partners to invest in practice in a significant way,” both of which he felt were least probable outcomes. Our intuitive minds can so easily be distracted, so such bookends help keep them on track and focused – see our Latest Worked Example.

His next challenge was to come-up with at least five realistic options for stretching his options to an optimal degree – you will see he produced six.  Look at our Latest Example and you will see those six options, one of those proposed was: “Option F – Bring in a professional CEO to run practice, turn it around – I just remain owner and practice.”

With his “pictogram” now in place, indicating all six options, it was now time for him to engage in some emotional distancing. Emotional distancing would allow his intuitive mind to sub-consciously ponder his six options, now they were all in place. It will also enable him to be more objective when he returned to this pictogram to make his optimum choice. Once he made that choice, it would be important for him to stick with it and create an associated action initiative, while it is still fresh in his mind.

Which option would you have chosen, if you were in his shoes?

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two weeks time: “Peeling the Onion: What is my most reasonable professional office option?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

What is our best option for increasing survey participants: using Option Solving?

How many times have you heard about people’s marketing woes? Almost as many times as you’ve heard about the fish that got away, no doubt? Your writer was listening to John the other day, when he shared his difficulties in getting people to respond to his survey activities. He was trying to figure out how he could increase the number of survey participants. So we discussed the option solving approach, which seemed to resonate with him.

Pretty soon we set-about producing a rational question to spark possible options. After discussing his situation, his question became: “What is our best shot at increasing survey participants: considering 1) have exhausted “committed” listing, 2) word-of-mouth is best marketing, 3) need the strongest branding metaphor, and 4) participants relate to their output?” Although we produced other considerations, John learned it was best to keep it to the latter four key ones without overly complicating his decision dilemma.

Now we had to get him to produce two “bookend” choices to serve as his yin and yang extreme possibilities, so as to hem-in his intuitive mind for concentrating on his most realistic set of options. The bookends he selected were: “Keep going with current mode” and “Find financing for expansive publicity program,” both of which he felt were least likely to occur. However, his bookends would serve the purpose of nudging his intuitive faculties into selecting more realistic but challenging options. Our intuitive minds can so easily be distracted, so these bookends help keep them on track and focused – see our Latest Worked Example.

John’s next challenge was to come-up with at least five realistic options for stretching his options to the maximum degree – you will see he produced six.  Look at our Latest Example and you will see those six options, one of those proposed was: “Option F – Create real-life client stories that resonate.”

With his “pictogram” now in place, indicating all six options, it was now time for John to engage in some emotional distancing. Emotional distancing would allow his intuitive mind to sub-consciously ponder his six options, now they were all in place. It also enabled him to be more objective when he returned to this pictogram to make his optimum choice. Once he made that choice, it would be important for him to stick with it and create an associated action initiative, while it was still fresh in his mind.

Which option would you have chosen, if you were in John’s shoes?

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two weeks time: “What is my most reasonable professional office option?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

What is our best option for re-connecting with 3 symposium contacts: using Option Solving?

Derrick recently discussed with me a symposium he attended, which was also serving as a networking event for his company. There wasn’t the greatest amount of time available for networking, so he created a somewhat unique informational card to help carry his message. He intended to strike-up conversations and then share his cards to get attendees to follow-through.

When the occasion came, it appeared to work with three participants. But, after a week, despite apparent interest, there was no follow-through contact. Now Derrick was wondering how he could regain contact with these individuals.

He became interested in the idea of option solving. So we set-about producing a rational question to trigger possible options. After due deliberation of his situation, his question turned out as: “What is our best shot at re-connecting with 3 symposia contacts: considering 1) 10 or more days have passed, 2) used an untried approach initially, 3) would like to turn things around, and 4) they appear to be interesting potential?” Although he produced other considerations, he learned it was best to keep it to the above four key ones without overly complicating his decision dilemma.

We then focused him on producing two “bookend” choices to serve as the yin and yang extreme possibilities, to hem-in his intuitive mind to concentrate on the most realistic set of options. The bookends he selected were: “Just let it go” and “Throw a financial incentive their way,” both of which he felt were least likely to occur. However, his bookends would serve the purpose of nudging his intuitive faculties into selecting more realistic but challenging options. Our intuitive minds can so easily be distracted, so these bookends help keep them on track and focused – see our Latest Worked Example.

Derrick’s next challenge was to come-up with at least five realistic options for stretching his options to the maximum degree – you will see he produced six.  Look at our Latest Example and you will see those six options, one of those proposed was: “Option D – Send package in mail with a special message.”

With this “pictogram” now in place, indicating six options, it was now time for Derrick to engage in emotional distancing. Emotional distancing would allow his intuitive mind to sub-consciously ponder his six options, once they were all in place. It also enabled him to be more objective when he returned to this pictogram to make his optimum choice. Once he made that choice, it would be important for him to stick with it and create an associated action initiative, while it was still fresh in his mind.

Which option would you have chosen, if you were in Derrick’s shoes?

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two weeks time: “What is our best option for increasing survey participants?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

What is a key leader’s best option for full individual adoption of communication survey exercise output: using Option Solving?

In recent times, a leadership team was exposed to an individual communication survey. Their own leader, who also participated, was eager for them to learn from the output and then adjust where necessary to both the company’s and their own advantage. As always, change isn’t easy and so there was discussion regarding the best approach for bringing that about.

In line with the first principle of option solving we set-about producing a rational question to trigger possible options. After a degree of due deliberation this turned out to be: “What is a key leader’s best option for full adoption of commun-ication survey exercise output: considering 1) people don’t easily change their habits, 2) they need practical, hands-on drills to focus on any change, 3) they need to experience the benefits, and 4) they need regular encouragement to change?” As usual, other considerations arose on the list, but the ones chosen above seemed to be the four key ones without overly complicating the key leader’s dilemma.

Now is the time to produce two “bookend” choices to serve as the yin and yang extreme possibilities, so as to focus our intuitive minds on the most realistic set of options. The bookends we chose for the key leader were: “Let it take a life of its own” and “Force-feed them into communicating with each other,” both of which will probably be the least likely to occur. However, these bookends do serve the purpose of nudging our intuitive faculties into identifying more realistic but challenging options. Our intuitive minds can so easily be distracted, so these bookends can help keep them on track – see our Latest Worked Example.

The next option solving challenge is to come-up with at least five realistic options for stretching their range of possibilities as much as possible – you will see we produced six…one for the key executive to insert him/herself when the time comes. (NOTE: It’s always a good idea to leave an option blank as a way of drawing your target to get involved.)  Look at our Latest Example and you will see those six options, one of those proposed was: “Option B – One-on-one mentoring to nudge participants forward.”

With this “pictogram” now in place, indicating five to six options, it is now time for emotional distancing. Emotional distancing allows our intuitive minds to sub-consciously ponder the likely six options, once they are all in place. This would enable the key executive to be more objective when he/she returns to this pictogram and chose which tactic to use to encourage his leaders to adjust to their survey output.

Which option would you have chosen, if you were in his/her shoes?

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two weeks time: “What is our best shot a re-connecting with three symposia contacts?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

What is Fox News’s best option with Bill O’Reilly: using Option Solving?

Until about a week ago Fox News’ parent board members spent 2-3 weeks deliberating on what to do with their champion news broadcaster, Bill O’Reilly. In anticipation of that decision, your editor went to work to figure out possible options at play in their deliberations.

The first principle of option solving is to produce a rational question to trigger the optimum solution. After due deliberation by your editor this turned out to be: “What is Fox News’ Owner’s best alternative on Bill O’Reilly ; considering 1) he has a tremendous following, 2) big advertisers are pulling out advertising support, 3) he has allegedly been involved with several sexual harassment cases, and 4) it may put the channel into decline?” Some other considerations did come up, but these seemed to be the four key ones without overly complicating the Board Directors’ dilemma.

With this question now in place, two unlikely “bookend” choices had to be found, the yin and yang, in order to focus the Board of Directors’ intuitive minds on their most realistic set of options. The bookends chosen for them were: “Ignore the whole thing” and “Underwrite him for a totally new media venture,” both of which were probably the least likely to occur. However, they do serve the purpose of prodding their intuitive faculties into identifying more realistic but challenging options. Their intuitive minds can so easily be distracted, so these bookends can help keep them on track – see our Latest Worked Example.

For option solving to be at its best, they would be challenged to consider at least five realistic options for stretching their range of possibilities as much as possible – you will see we produced six. Look at our Latest Example and you will see those six options, one of those proposed was: “Option F – Suspend and then move him to a new show in 6 months time.” With their “pictogram” now in place, indicating their range of six options, they would now have some time for emotional distancing. Emotional distancing would allow their intuitive minds to sub-consciously ponder the six options your editor offered. This would enable them to be more objective when they returned to this offered pictogram.

Which option would you have chosen, if you were in their shoes? In fact they ended up choosing option E, but, as is so often the case, they probably only considered two options in an effort to make their decision easier. Your editor would have liked them to have chosen option F, since that would have enabled them to make their point in a firm way and then given them the opportunity to utilize his talents with a fresh beginning…despite a short-term outcry from their baying competitors.

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two weeks time: “What is our best approach to get the full-adoption of a survey’s output?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)