Welcome to Option Solving (for dealing with your Decision Dilemmas) -also see latest examples below;and many more.

 See above, “What is my optimum way of dealing with a colleague bad apple?”  At our next blog in two weeks, we will deal with: “What is my best approach for developing an internal-extended sales team?”  Also, go to http://www.youtube.com and type in Option Solving and go for the 1 min 48 sec version: this will refer you to OSOLing (Option Solving On-line: a virtual way to deal with your Dilemmas)READ ABOUT THE INTERESTING, WIDE-RANGING APPLICATIONS BELOW: including the latest blog. Go to SUBSCRIBE email-to your left, if you want regular notification of blog updates.

Read the book, Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options. And visit the author’s main website at www.ileadershipsolutions.com

Peter Arthur-Smith, Originator of Option Solving

Peter Arthur-Smith, Originator of Option Solving

Daniel H. Pink, author of business best seller “A Whole New Mind”, with new book “Drive” says, “Peter Arthur-Smith has produced a savvy and practical book that will change how you approach the challenges in your business. By showing you the limits of ‘problem-solving’ and the power of whole-minded thinking. SMART DECISIONS will expand your strategies and widen your possibilities.”

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What is my optimum way for dealing with a colleague bad apple: using Option Solving?

It was a particularly painful conversation to listen to a friend talking about a work colleague who was constantly seeming to sabotage his team’s efforts. He was considerably emotional and annoyed at this person’s behavior. Your writer then suggested that he use the option solving format to draw upon an objective and optimum approach.

Since he was familiar with the format, he immediately set his rational faculties to work for drawing-up an appropriate question, to set his considerable innate abilities to work. His question turned out as follows: “What’s my best option for dealing with a colleague bad apple; considering 1) person has established themselves as indispensable, 2) (s)he has manager’s support, 3) (s)he keeps being disruptive with my group, and 4) my own people impatience doesn’t help?” He restricted himself to his top four considerations, even though there were several others, so as not to further complicate his final conclusion.

Now that his question was ready, he then set to work on two yin and yang “bookends” as extreme possibilities, so they would further focus his intuitive, decision-making mind on his most realistic options. Bookends such as these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus. We are mostly unaware at how powerfully valuable but foot-loose our intuition can be unless effectively focused.   

Bookends for this step turned out to be: “Let sleeping dogs lie” and “Just leave and go work somewhere else”: both of which were his least likely possibilities for the reasons given. But at least they would nudge him to consider and produce his most realistic options – see our Latest Worked Example.

He was then challenged to produce at least five realistic options, so as to stretch his range of possibilities as much as possible. In fact, we left open a sixth option, too, for him to mull over, in case he revealed another option within the next couple of hours. Feel free to review his five-six proposed options in our Latest Example, one of which was: “Option- B: Set-up meeting with our mutual boss to hear both sides.”

With his new, provisional “pictogram” now in place, he would be able to review, adjust or add to it over next few hours, while things were still fresh. He would then be persuaded to set aside some time for emotional distancing – a form of objective thinking – before making any choice…perhaps after 2 hours, later that day, or first thing the following morning.

Emotional distancing would allow his intuitive mind to sub-consciously ponder his five-six options and draw upon his many diverse experiences and choices; thereby arriving at an optimal decision. What option would you have chosen?

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “What is my best approach for developing an internal-extended sales team?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

What could be XYZ’s optimum initial option during talks with potential business collaborators: using Option Solving?

Talking with another consultant-company advisor the other day, your editor found her considering options for moving her business activities forward. She had been talking with several prospective partners-collaborators and wasn’t sure which way to go. Your editor then introduced her to option solving and its merits caught her attention.

From there, we set about framing an appropriate rational question, to catch the attention of her intuitive mind, which came out as follows: “What could be XYZ’s optimum initial option during talks with potential business collaborators; considering 1) am working with a steady group of clients, 2) a 2019 focus on book writing, 3) revamp of our Website, and 4) find complementary partner(s) to move venture forward?” We contained ourselves to only using the top four considerations, even though there were several others, so as not to further complicate her final decision.

With this question now in place, she then needed two yin and yang “bookends” as extreme possibilities, so they would further focus her intuitive, decision-making mind on her most realistic options. Bookends such as these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus. We are mostly unaware at how powerfully valuable but foot-loose our intuition can be unless effectively focused.   

The bookends she determined for this step were: “Haphazard, opportunist way forward” and “Give away XYZ’s valuable assets – withdraw from the market-place”: both of which were her least likely possibilities for the reasons given. But at least they would nudge her to consider and produce her most realistic options – see our Latest Worked Example.

Then we aimed to produce at least five realistic options, so as to stretch her range of possibilities as much as possible. In fact, we left open a sixth option, too, for her to mull over, in case she revealed another option within the next couple of hours. Feel free to review her five-six proposed options in our Latest Example, one of which was: “Option- A: Seek loose collaboration with likely business ‘partner’.”

With this new, provisional “pictogram” now in place, she would be able to review, adjust or add to it over next few hours, while things were still fresh. We would then encourage her to set aside some time for emotional distancing – a form of objective thinking – before making any choice…perhaps after 2 hours, later that day, or first thing the following morning.

Emotional distancing would allow her intuitive mind to sub-consciously review her five-six options and benefit from her many diverse experiences and choices; thereby arriving at an optimal solution. What option would you have chosen?

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “What is my optimum way of dealing with a bad apple?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

Peel the Onion – What optimum sales strategy should VP Sales pursue during 2019: using Option Solving?

With our mid-December blog we produced a potential option solving pictogram for a VP Sales who was considering his 2019 sales strategy. As a way of stimulating the process, your editor took this exercise one step further and chose Option EUse a client top down strategy – Self and Co-Presidents  –  to make hi-level entrée then hand over to second-tier marketers to follow-through and consummate.  Your editor has now taken a stab at peeling this onion and seeing what sub-options might be available to his company by pursuing this choice.

We immediately created a new Option E rational question to start the ball rolling. It looked something like this: “Peeling the Onion: What is optimum VP Sales strategy during 2019: Option E- Use a top-down sales strategy for targeted prospects; considering 1) need for compelling top-level security message, 2) requires an executive-level seller, 3) must have competent second-tier sellers to leverage opportunities, and 4) requires effective long-range strategy?” We stuck with only using the top four considerations, even though there were several others, so as not to further complicate any final decisions.

Our question in place, then required two yin and yang “bookends” as extreme possibilities, so they would further focus the VP Sales’ intuitive, decision-making mind on his most realistic sub-options. Bookends such as these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus. We are mostly unaware at how powerfully valuable but foot-loose our intuition can be unless effectively focused.   

The sub-bookends we proposed for this step were: “Wait for invitations to top-level meetings” and “Special invitation dinners at top clubs w/top industry experts”: both of which were again the least likely possibilities for the reasons given. But at least they would nudge the VP Sales’ mind to consider his most realistic sub-options – see our Latest Worked Example.

Then we aimed to produce at least five realistic options, so as to stretch his range of possibilities as much as possible. In fact, we found a sixth option, too, for his intuition to mull over. Feel free to review our six proposed options in our Latest Example, one of which was: “Option-FF: Special topic, high profile speaker dinner- round tables w/ prospects and clients.”

With this new “pictogram” now in place, the VP Sales would be able to review and adjust it. We would then encourage him to set aside some time for emotional distancing – a form of objective thinking – before making any choice…perhaps after 2 hours, later that day, or first thing the following morning.

Emotional distancing would allow his intuitive mind to sub-consciously review these six options and benefit from his many similar life experiences and choices; thereby arriving at an optimal solution. What option would you have chosen?

Once he made his decision, preferably with his principals involved, then he could either decide on another round of Peeling the Onion, sub-sub-options, for further tactical clarity; OR move ahead with creating an action initiative for FF or any other choice, while everything was fresh. Once he has put this in place, he should not change his mind and press on toward success.

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “Looking for Partner or Collaborator?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

What optimum sales strategy should VP Sales pursue during 2019: using Option Solving?

Many VP Sales are currently considering their sales team strategies before 2018 year end. Your editor has one particular sales executive’s future thinking in mind, consequently decided to give it a dry-run with some advance-thought option solving.

Initially we created a typical rational question to start the ball rolling, which went something like this: “What optimum strategy should VP Sales pursue during 2019; considering 1) have gained some renewed momentum during 2018, 2) it’s a strategic, long cycle sell, 3) sales team needs further upgrading, and 4) our company has a great reputation?” Again, we kept to using only the top four considerations, even though there were several others, so as not to overly complicate the VP Sales decision making task.

We then inserted two yin and yang “bookends” as extreme possibilities, so they would help focus the VP Sales’ intuitive, decision-making mind on his most realistic options. Bookends such as these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus. We are mostly unaware at how powerfully valuable but foot-loose our intuition can be unless effectively focused.   

The bookends we chose to use were: “Just keep going as we are” and “Completely scrap current team and rebuild” both of which were the least likely possibilities for the example reasons given. But at least they would shake the VP Sales’ mind to consider his most realistic options – see our Latest Worked Example.

Then we set about producing at least five realistic options, so as to stretch his range of possibilities as much as possible. In fact, we left a sixth option open for him to insert his own choice, if one occurs to him, which would aid his buy-in to the whole option solving approach. Feel free to review our five options in our Latest Example, one of which was: “Option-D: Use hunter-led sales teams.”

With this almost completed “pictogram” now in place, we would then encourage the VP Sales to review, adjust it and insert his own sixth option, which would increase his interest and commitment to the option solving approach. We would then encourage him to set aside some time for emotional distancing – a form of objective thinking – before making any choice…perhaps after 2 hours, later that day, or first thing the following morning.

Emotional distancing would allow his intuitive mind to sub-consciously review his range of options – maybe six – to benefit from his many similar life experience and choices; thereby arriving at a rhyming, optimal solution. What option would you have chosen?

In fact, later that day, he did add a sixth option, and then utilized some emotional distancing before making his choice. However, he felt his choice didn’t go far enough, so we encouraged him to utilize a “Peeling the Onion” approach to add more substance to his choice.

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “Peeling the Onion: What optimum sales strategy should VP Sales pursue during 2019?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

What is the Dodger’s optimum team flight home to LA from Boston after World Series Game 2: using Option Solving?

Owing to your editor’s travels, an item about the World Series has become somewhat dated. However, because it has an important team leadership decision example to consider, it is still valuable to share. It came down to two team coaches making optimum decisions when the stakes are very high. It demonstrates how option solving can play a key role at such an important moment.

We decided to focus on Dave Roberts, the Dodgers Coach, due to his more challenging decision moment, and therefore would encourage him to consider the question: “What is Dodgers’ optimum team flight home to LA from Boston after World Series Game 2; considering 1) sustaining team morale, 2) mitigating against team fatigue, 3) giving players time to unwind, and 4) optimum economics?” Again, we’re using only the top four considerations among others, so as not to overly complicate Roberts’ decision making task.

He will now see two yin and yang “bookends” we created for him to serve as extreme possibilities. These bookends would then help focus his intuitive, decision-making mind on his most realistic options. Bookends like these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus. We are unaware at how powerful but foot-loose our intuition can be unless effectively focused.   

The  bookends we gave him were: “Most economical trip regardless of player sentiment” and “Ultra first-class travel option:” both of which were the least likely possibilities for the example reasons given, but at least they would shake his mind to consider his most realistic options – see our Latest Worked Example.

Now we embarked upon producing at least five realistic options, so as to stretch his range of possibilities as much as possible. In fact, we left a sixth option open for him to insert another choice, if one occurs to him, which would assist his buy-in to the whole approach. Feel free to review our five options in our Latest Example, one of which was: “Option-C: Leave midday East Coast Time following day ≡ 9.00 am LA time.”

With his almost completed “pictogram” now in place, we would then encourage him to review it and make a decision on his way from Milwaukee to Boston: while his mind was under least pressure after winning a successful Division series in Wisconsin. He would be wise to have set aside some time for emotional distancing – a form of objective thinking – before making his choice; possibly after he landed. Emotional distancing would allow his intuitive mind to sub-consciously review his range of options – maybe six – to benefit from his many similar life experiences and choices; thereby seeking an optimal solution. What option would you have chosen?

During the time he and his assistant coaches and logistics people are together in Boston, he would share his proposed pictogram to get their input and collective decision view. That way they will likely buy-into into the whole thing. Their best option will be revealed to the players after game 2 of the World Series in Boston, so that members won’t be distracted from their game mission. At that moment, Roberts and his assistant coaches and logistics people will reveal their recommendation and, with luck, the players will buy-in because they will already be exhausted and proper preparations will have been made.

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “What will be the optimum strategy option for VP Sales to pursue during 2019?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

What should XYZ’s focus be for the foreseeable future: using Option Solving?

Product development activities put consulting firm XYZ into the lucky position of figuring out what would be its best immediate focus in light of its current market positioning.  Option solving, one of its many techniques, proved to be a great tool to help in this key decision.

Hence its Principal put together an appropriate rational question, such as:  “What should XYZ’s focus be for the foreseeable future; considering 1) only finite time available, 2) limited funding, 3) need to break-out of current limited tracks, and 4) wish to take advantage of XYZ’s strengths?” Take note of using only the top four considerations, from several others, so as not to overly complicate any decision making task.

He then set-to on creating two yin and yang “bookends” to serve as extreme possibilities. These bookends would then help focus his intuitive, decision-making mind on his most realistic options. Bookends like these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus. We are unaware at how powerful but foot-loose our intuition can be unless effectively focused.   

Next he chose bookends: “Just go with the daily flow” and “Throw towel-in with someone else;” both of which were the least likely possibilities, but at least they would rattle his mind to come-up with the most realistic options – see our Latest Worked Example.

From there he set about producing at least five realistic options, so as to stretch his range of possibilities wherever possible. Your decision success is known to be more suspect with just two or few options. You will see where he, in fact, produced six. Feel free to review his six options in our Latest Example, one of which was: “Option-E: Drum-up more readers for Website blog.”

With his completed “pictogram” now in place, he then set aside some time for emotional distancing – a form of objective thinking – before making his choice. Emotional distancing would allow his intuitive mind to sub-consciously review his range of options to benefit from many similar life experiences and choices; thereby seeking an optimal solution. What option would you have chosen?

Some time later he came back to his pictogram to make an optimum decision, based upon his intuitive judgment. After a quick review, he made his choice and then set-about putting together an “Action Initiative” to follow through on his decision. With this approach he is likely to come out ahead as far as is possible.

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “What is the Dodger’s optimum team flight home to LA from Boston after World Series Game 2?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)