Keeping People Motivated: using Option Solving?

Questions are often raised about how to motivate people, so we set out on a relatively simple quest to get the thoughts of executives wherever the opportunity arises. We want to give them an opportunity to determine this question through a series of options, which, at the same time, will give them a good idea of what Option Solving is all about. So, we created an option solving example around this interesting question.
Firstly, of course, we started to define an appropriate question, which started off like this: “What is our best option for keeping our people motivated, considering…” Two points here: A) Note the question starts with “What.” This is designed to engage our intuition, since we use our intuition to answer questions of opinion or open ended questions. B) We have introduced the possibility of considerations. If we pick the right ones, this will further provide our intuition with the ammunition to come up with a particularly good option.
There are many considerations that could be listed here and they would probably be different for different organizations. But we can reasonably assume three that might pop up: ‘Budgetary constraints,’ ‘Possible unrealistic expectations,’ and ‘Other stakeholders to keep happy.’ You can now view the final complete question under the Latest Example tab.
Then we came up with two “bookends,” the “yin and yang” extreme possibilities that come to mind from this question. The ones that immediately came to mind are: “Let people take care of themselves” and “Kill people with kindness.”
With these in place, our intuitive minds were now firmly challenged to come up with a range of plausible options between these two extremes. We didn’t have to think too hard to come up with the first one: “Utilize a high degree of incentives,” the other four you will find in our Latest Example.
At this point, you allow executives some time out for “emotional distancing,” by shutting away the option solving picture for 5-10 minutes, to give participants’ intuitive minds time to chew over the options and trade-offs, while talking about other things. They are then ready to make their optimum choice. If there is a group of participants, which always facilitates the best overall decision, then they are given the opportunity to make confidential choices to mitigate against the ‘herd mentality’. We’ll leave you pick the one that you feel best meets the question.
If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area. Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting in 2 weeks: “Using Option Solving to decide on ‘On our best option for rewarding people without clocking their time?’” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger.)

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Stimulating the Economy in Spring 2009: using Option Solving?

The recent flurry to try and get the economy moving again, by means of a jobs stimulation package, provides an opportunity to once again demonstrate how option solving can be beneficial with national choices just as much as business, professional or personal choices. Once an options picture was created, as per our Latest Example, then a confidential poll could have been taken of all economists, business, union, and non-profit organizations to determine the voted outcome. Politicians could then have used it as a strong guide for any ultimate decisions. Is this the way of the future?
In producing these alternatives during the spring of 2009, when any effective decision at that time could have headed off a worsening crisis (rather than try to fix it today): the first step would have been to come up with an appropriate question, which would have looked like, “What is the country’s best option for stimulating the economy in spring 2009, considering…?”
Wise owls would then have set about producing a list of considerations, which would have probably been extensive, but cut down by wise prioritization to: ‘financial industry crisis,’ ‘surging unemployment,’ ‘heading for a deep world recession,’ and so on .Take a look at the complete question under the Latest Example tab. Coming up with the right overall question is key to whatever method you use, especially as our rational minds are designed to compose and pose the most valid question for our intuitive minds to make a judgment call.
The wise group then set about establishing two “bookends:” yin and yang possibilities to frame and spark any forthcoming plausible options. These could’ve been, ‘Let the market find its own way’ at one end and ‘Government takeover of all banks in order to act according to “users” interests.’ Neither was viable, but they would have been used to act as stimulation for the wise owls’ intuitions. Again, see Latest Example tab.
Once these were in place, the wise owls proceeded in sub-groups to come up with 5 plausible options in view of the money earmarked by congress. You can let us know which one you would have voted for. Then we can all guess the one that the economists of all persuasions, business groups, unions, and non-profits might have chosen.
Hopefully they would all give their intuitive minds time to chew over the options and trade-offs, which our minds are so attuned to doing. Such a natural break is called “emotional distancing” and is an important step for getting the most out of this technique and our extraordinary intuitive capabilities.
If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area. Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting in 2 weeks: “Using Option Solving to decide on ‘What is our best option for keeping people motivated?’” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger.)