Welcome to Option Solving (for dealing with your Decision Dilemmas) -also see latest examples below;and many more.

 See above, “What should XYZ’s focus be for the foreseeable future?”  At our next blog in two weeks, we will deal with: “What is the Dodger’s optimum team flight home to LA from Boston after World Series Game 2?”  Also, go to http://www.youtube.com and type in Option Solving and go for the 1 min 48 sec version: this will refer you to OSOLing (Option Solving On-line: a virtual way to deal with your Dilemmas)READ ABOUT THE INTERESTING, WIDE-RANGING APPLICATIONS BELOW: including the latest blog. Go to SUBSCRIBE email-to your left, if you want regular notification of blog updates.

Read the book, Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options. And visit the author’s main website at www.ileadershipsolutions.com

Peter Arthur-Smith, Originator of Option Solving

Peter Arthur-Smith, Originator of Option Solving

Daniel H. Pink, author of business best seller “A Whole New Mind”, with new book “Drive” says, “Peter Arthur-Smith has produced a savvy and practical book that will change how you approach the challenges in your business. By showing you the limits of ‘problem-solving’ and the power of whole-minded thinking. SMART DECISIONS will expand your strategies and widen your possibilities.”

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What should XYZ’s focus be for the foreseeable future: using Option Solving?

Product development activities put consulting firm XYZ into the lucky position of figuring out what would be its best immediate focus in light of its current market positioning.  Option solving, one of its many techniques, proved to be a great tool to help in this key decision.

Hence its Principal put together an appropriate rational question, such as:  “What should XYZ’s focus be for the foreseeable future; considering 1) only finite time available, 2) limited funding, 3) need to break-out of current limited tracks, and 4) wish to take advantage of XYZ’s strengths?” Take note of using only the top four considerations, from several others, so as not to overly complicate any decision making task.

He then set-to on creating two yin and yang “bookends” to serve as extreme possibilities. These bookends would then help focus his intuitive, decision-making mind on his most realistic options. Bookends like these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus. We are unaware at how powerful but foot-loose our intuition can be unless effectively focused.   

Next he chose bookends: “Just go with the daily flow” and “Throw towel-in with someone else;” both of which were the least likely possibilities, but at least they would rattle his mind to come-up with the most realistic options – see our Latest Worked Example.

From there he set about producing at least five realistic options, so as to stretch his range of possibilities wherever possible. Your decision success is known to be more suspect with just two or few options. You will see where he, in fact, produced six. Feel free to review his six options in our Latest Example, one of which was: “Option-E: Drum-up more readers for Website blog.”

With his completed “pictogram” now in place, he then set aside some time for emotional distancing – a form of objective thinking – before making his choice. Emotional distancing would allow his intuitive mind to sub-consciously review his range of options to benefit from many similar life experiences and choices; thereby seeking an optimal solution. What option would you have chosen?

Some time later he came back to his pictogram to make an optimum decision, based upon his intuitive judgment. After a quick review, he made his choice and then set-about putting together an “Action Initiative” to follow through on his decision. With this approach he is likely to come out ahead as far as is possible.

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “What is the Dodger’s optimum team flight home to LA from Boston after World Series Game 2?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

What is my best approach toward launching our Organization Culture Discovery Experience: using Option Solving?

Sometimes you have to take your own medicine.  So, faced with a decision on how to launch a new client product option, your editor is now figuring how to proceed based upon known factors.

He firstly figures out an appropriate rational question, such as:  “What is my best approach toward launching our Organization Culture Discovery Experience; considering 1) limited funding, 2) gaining appropriate assists-advice, 3) creating effective market message, and 4) building strong momentum?” You will notice the use of the top four considerations, from several others, so as not to overly complicate any decision making task.

He then set-about creating two yin and yang “bookends,” which would serve as extreme possibilities. Such bookends would then help focus your editor’s intuitive, decision-making mind on his most realistic options. Bookends like these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus. We are unaware at how powerful but foot-loose our intuition can be unless effectively focused.   

Your editor chose bookends: “Abandon this effort” and “Give idea away to likely ‘winner’;” both of which were the least likely possibilities, but at least they would instigate his mind to come-up with the most realistic options – see our Latest Worked Example.

Now he set about developing at least five realistic options, so as to stretch his range of possibilities wherever possible. Your decision success is known to be more suspect with just two or few options. You will see where he, in fact, produced six. Feel free to review his six options in our Latest Example, one of which was: “Option-A: Build prototype 2 for more extensive exposure.”

With his completed “pictogram” now in place, he then set aside some time for emotional distancing – a form of objective thinking – before making his choice. Emotional distancing would allow his intuitive mind to sub-consciously review his range of options to benefit from many similar life experiences and choices; thereby seeking an optimal solution. What option would you have chosen?

Once his decision was made, he then set-about putting together an “Action Initiative” to follow through on his decision. With this approach he is likely to come out ahead as far as is possible.

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the

COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “What should XYZ’s focus be for the foreseeable future?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

What is my best option for Offloading My Business: using Option Solving?

Only just the other day, your editor found himself talking with a business owner who was looking for a way to sell his business and retire. Because the owner hadn’t been the most astute business person, its likely value wouldn’t be as much as he hoped and therefore it was best for him to consider all his options.

At that point, your editor explained the Option Solving technique as a way of arriving at an optimal solution. This brought about the owner arriving at the rational question: “What is my optimum option for offloading my business over the next 18-24 months; considering 1) don’t desire to be leader anymore, 2) want to get an optimum payout, 3) there is a marginal staff team, and 4) it’s tough to attract high caliber professionals in our area?” You will see he picked out his top four considerations, from several others, so as not to overly complicate his decision making task.

The owner was then encouraged to create two yin and yang “bookends,” which would serve as his extreme possibilities. Such bookends would then help focus his intuitive, decision-making mind on his most realistic options. Bookends like these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus.

His chosen yin and yang bookends were: “Just let the business waste away” and “Refinance and rebuild optimal business;” both of which were the least likely possibilities, but at least they would instigate his mind to come-up with the most realistic options – see our Latest Worked Example.

Now he was exercised to develop at least five realistic options, so as to stretch his range of possibilities wherever possible. Your decision success is known to be more suspect with just two or few options.  You will see where he, in fact, produced five realistic options then actually came up with six. Feel free to review his six choices in our Latest Example, one of which was: “Option-F: Merge with another similar, local business.”

With his “pictogram” now created, he was now advised to set aside some time for emotional distancing – a form of objective thinking – before making his choice. Emotional distancing would allow his intuitive mind to sub-consciously review his range of options against so many of his similar life experiences and choices; thereby seeking an optimal solution. What option would you have chosen?

After due thought, he indicated that he would make his choice, after sleeping on it overnight, and would then consider  using “Peeling the Onion” technique to look for greater action insights.

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “Peeling the Onion for: What is my optimum option for offloading my business over the next 18-24 months?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

What is my best option for turning XYZ Region around in a timely fashion: using Option Solving?

Not so long ago I was chatting with a senior executive about is latest challenge: turning one of his regions around as quickly as possible. He had already found and inserted a fresh regional leader, so was now thinking about how he could work with this person to optimally move things in the right direction. This senior executive was already familiar with option solving; consequently we were off to a quick start in our quest for a potential solution.

We quickly got into a rational question mode to stimulate his intuitive mind into assisting his quest; which was: “What is my best option for turning XYZ Region around in a timely fashion; considering 1) have installed new, promising regional leader, 2) plan to move to new office location, 3) have cycled through 3 leaders with same team, and 4) there’s plenty of business potential in the State?” You will notice how he picked out his top four considerations, from several others, so as not to overly complicate his decision making task.

Then he turned to creating two yin and yang “bookends,” which would serve as his extreme possibilities. Such bookends would then help focus his intuitive, decision-making mind on his most realistic options. Bookends like these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus.

The yin and yang bookends that came through were: “Just let it play out naturally” and “Clear out & start afresh;” both of which were the least likely possibilities, but at least they would instigate his mind to come-up with the most realistic possibilities – see our Latest Worked Example.

Now he was exercised to develop at least five realistic options, so as to stretch his range of possibilities wherever possible. You will see where he, in fact, produced five realistic options then and there and we left him to think about a possible sixth, if that came to mind over the next few hours. Feel free to review his initial five in our Latest Example, one of which was: “Option-D: Make a weekly presence over next 2 months to support new leader.”

With this “pictogram” now created, he would could then think through a sixth option, if it exists, and then set aside some time for emotional distancing – a form of objective thinking – before making his choice. Emotional distancing would allow his intuitive mind to sub-consciously review this range of options against so many of his similar life experiences and choices; thereby seeking an optimal solution. What option would you have chosen?

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the

COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “What is my optimum option for offloading my business over the next 18-24 months?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

What is my best option for keeping my boss on-board: using Option Solving?

It was only a number of weeks ago that I found myself talking with an executive on how to keep her boss on-board. As part of a sizeable organization, she had done well and risen to a fairly important role. But, the talents she used for rising to her current position were now starting to create political waves. One of those talents was being candid about what needed to be done to keep customers on board – politics be damned! She had lashed out at more than one senior colleague about not stepping up to the plate, in order to help customers out, but now these colleagues were beginning to bite back to defend their reputations.

We discussed the advantages of option solving before taking up her political battles, since it facilitated the “opportunity to think before acting.” With this in mind, her next challenge was regrouping with her boss in an effort to turn over a fresh leaf. After walking her through the option solving technique, she then produced a question as follows to start the option solving ball rolling: “What is my best option for keeping my boss on board; considering 1) HR is convincing him to drop his support, 2) HR is making this a bigger crisis than necessary, 3) I have my reputation to protect, and 4) I’m being closed out due to prior events?” You will notice she alluded to her four most important considerations, even though there were probably others, so as not to overly complicate her decision task.

Now she turned to creating two yin and yang “bookends,” which would serve as her extreme possibilities. Such bookends would then help focus her intuitive faculties toward her most realistic options. Bookends like these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus.

Her yin and yang bookends that surfaced were: “Just resign” and “Crawl back into my company’s favor,” both of which seemed the least likely possibilities: but at least they would challenge her to think through her most realistic possibilities – see our Latest Worked Example.

From here she was encouraged to develop at least five realistic options, so as to stretch her range of possibilities. You will see where she, in fact, produced six realistic options for her to consider before turning to emotional distancing. Feel free to review her potential six in our Latest Example, one of which was: “Option-F: Become an independent contractor.”

With the “pictogram” she had now created, she would now set it aside for some time while she pursued some emotional distancing – a form of objective thinking – before making her choice. Emotional distancing would allow her intuitive mind to sub-consciously review this range of options against so many of her similar life experiences and choices; thereby seeking an optimal solution. What option would you have chosen?

Within 24 hours, maybe an hour or two, she would revisit her pictogram and, after a few moments, make her intuitive choice. She would be wise not to second-guess herself, since by doing so she would likely over-rule her best instincts and make a poor choice. In other words, despite any potential misgivings, stick with your choice and work it through into a doable action initiative. Then stick with your initiative and, apart from some departure points along the way, where new option solving gambits could be pursued, you are most likely to come away with optimum (not perfect) success.

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “What is my best option for turning XYZ Region around in a timely fashion?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

What is my best option for handling a political nemesis: using Option Solving?

A particular executive found herself under pressure from another group leader with the likely intent of wanting to take her position. Despite good results within her group, her political sensitivity hadn’t been quite as strong as it should be, consequently political gaffes here and there created openings for others to feel they could handle her job better. So now she was left to figure out what approach she should take going forward.

Once the option solving approach was explained to her, she decided to get involved and developed an initial question as follows: “What is my best option for handling a political nemesis; considering 1) my team is doing pretty well, 2) I have good retirement options, 3) my boss appears to still want me around, and 4) my nemesis wants my position?” You will notice there are four considerations to provide perspective to the question. Even though there were probably others, she kept it to the most important ones so as not to overly complicate her decision task.

Now she turned to creating two yin and yang “bookends,” which would serve as her extreme possibilities. Such bookends would then help focus her intuitive faculties toward her most realistic options. Bookends like these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus.

Her yin and yang bookends that surfaced were: “Just ignore the whole situation” and “Make a deal with my nemesis,” both of which seemed the least likely possibilities: but at least they would challenge her to think through her most realistic possibilities – see our Latest Worked Example.

From here she was encouraged to develop at least five realistic options, so as to stretch her range of possibilities. You will see where she, in fact, produced six realistic options for her to consider before turning to emotional distancing. Feel free to review her potential six in our Latest Example, one of which was: “Option-B: Insert key team member between myself and nemesis.”

With the “pictogram” she had now created, she would now set it aside for some time while she pursued some emotional distancing before making her choice. Emotional distancing would allow her intuitive mind to sub-consciously review this range of options against so many of her similar life experiences and choices; thereby seeking an optimal solution. What option would you have chosen?

Within 24 hours, maybe an hour or two, she would revisit her pictogram and, after a few moments, make her intuitive choice. She would be wise not to second-guess herself, since by doing so she would likely over-rule her best instincts and make a poor choice. In other words, despite any potential misgivings, stick with your choice and work it through into a doable action initiative. Stick with your initiative and, apart from some departure points along the way, where new option solving gambits could be pursued, you are most likely to come away with optimum (not perfect) success.

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “What is my best option for keeping my boss on board?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)