What is the Dodger’s optimum team flight home to LA from Boston after World Series Game 2: using Option Solving?

Owing to your editor’s travels, an item about the World Series has become somewhat dated. However, because it has an important team leadership decision example to consider, it is still valuable to share. It came down to two team coaches making optimum decisions when the stakes are very high. It demonstrates how option solving can play a key role at such an important moment.

We decided to focus on Dave Roberts, the Dodgers Coach, due to his more challenging decision moment, and therefore would encourage him to consider the question: “What is Dodgers’ optimum team flight home to LA from Boston after World Series Game 2; considering 1) sustaining team morale, 2) mitigating against team fatigue, 3) giving players time to unwind, and 4) optimum economics?” Again, we’re using only the top four considerations among others, so as not to overly complicate Roberts’ decision making task.

He will now see two yin and yang “bookends” we created for him to serve as extreme possibilities. These bookends would then help focus his intuitive, decision-making mind on his most realistic options. Bookends like these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus. We are unaware at how powerful but foot-loose our intuition can be unless effectively focused.   

The  bookends we gave him were: “Most economical trip regardless of player sentiment” and “Ultra first-class travel option:” both of which were the least likely possibilities for the example reasons given, but at least they would shake his mind to consider his most realistic options – see our Latest Worked Example.

Now we embarked upon producing at least five realistic options, so as to stretch his range of possibilities as much as possible. In fact, we left a sixth option open for him to insert another choice, if one occurs to him, which would assist his buy-in to the whole approach. Feel free to review our five options in our Latest Example, one of which was: “Option-C: Leave midday East Coast Time following day ≡ 9.00 am LA time.”

With his almost completed “pictogram” now in place, we would then encourage him to review it and make a decision on his way from Milwaukee to Boston: while his mind was under least pressure after winning a successful Division series in Wisconsin. He would be wise to have set aside some time for emotional distancing – a form of objective thinking – before making his choice; possibly after he landed. Emotional distancing would allow his intuitive mind to sub-consciously review his range of options – maybe six – to benefit from his many similar life experiences and choices; thereby seeking an optimal solution. What option would you have chosen?

During the time he and his assistant coaches and logistics people are together in Boston, he would share his proposed pictogram to get their input and collective decision view. That way they will likely buy-into into the whole thing. Their best option will be revealed to the players after game 2 of the World Series in Boston, so that members won’t be distracted from their game mission. At that moment, Roberts and his assistant coaches and logistics people will reveal their recommendation and, with luck, the players will buy-in because they will already be exhausted and proper preparations will have been made.

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “What will be the optimum strategy option for VP Sales to pursue during 2019?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

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What should XYZ’s focus be for the foreseeable future: using Option Solving?

Product development activities put consulting firm XYZ into the lucky position of figuring out what would be its best immediate focus in light of its current market positioning.  Option solving, one of its many techniques, proved to be a great tool to help in this key decision.

Hence its Principal put together an appropriate rational question, such as:  “What should XYZ’s focus be for the foreseeable future; considering 1) only finite time available, 2) limited funding, 3) need to break-out of current limited tracks, and 4) wish to take advantage of XYZ’s strengths?” Take note of using only the top four considerations, from several others, so as not to overly complicate any decision making task.

He then set-to on creating two yin and yang “bookends” to serve as extreme possibilities. These bookends would then help focus his intuitive, decision-making mind on his most realistic options. Bookends like these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus. We are unaware at how powerful but foot-loose our intuition can be unless effectively focused.   

Next he chose bookends: “Just go with the daily flow” and “Throw towel-in with someone else;” both of which were the least likely possibilities, but at least they would rattle his mind to come-up with the most realistic options – see our Latest Worked Example.

From there he set about producing at least five realistic options, so as to stretch his range of possibilities wherever possible. Your decision success is known to be more suspect with just two or few options. You will see where he, in fact, produced six. Feel free to review his six options in our Latest Example, one of which was: “Option-E: Drum-up more readers for Website blog.”

With his completed “pictogram” now in place, he then set aside some time for emotional distancing – a form of objective thinking – before making his choice. Emotional distancing would allow his intuitive mind to sub-consciously review his range of options to benefit from many similar life experiences and choices; thereby seeking an optimal solution. What option would you have chosen?

Some time later he came back to his pictogram to make an optimum decision, based upon his intuitive judgment. After a quick review, he made his choice and then set-about putting together an “Action Initiative” to follow through on his decision. With this approach he is likely to come out ahead as far as is possible.

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “What is the Dodger’s optimum team flight home to LA from Boston after World Series Game 2?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)