What is a family’s best storage option: using Option Solving?”

A month ago I came across a family struggling with what to do with their items from a former second home in storage. They had been stuck there for some time and were costing mounting monthly fees with no end in sight. It was a good distance away from the prime family home, so not at a convenient location. I therefore got the key couple together and took them through an option solving  scenario.

This started with challenging them to come up with coming up with an appropriate rational looking question, “What is the best option for moving family things out of storage; considering distant storage location, cost of sustaining storage, and absorbing items elsewhere?” There were other considerations, but these were the key ones so as not to  over-complicate the picture.

With this question in their sights, I now encouraged them to develop appropriate Yin and Yang “bookends”; so as to stimulate their thinking and to provide outer limits on their options. Their two bookends turned out to be: “Just leave in current storage,” at one end, with, “Trash everything” at the other. Look at our Latest Example to see why these were unlikely options.

 

Now they had the option solving framework in place, I challenged them  to discern at least five plausible options by calling on their experiences and intuitive senses. (Note: They were encouraged to produce at least five options to stretch their creative thinking.)  One of their options was: “Move to current home asap, sort and absorb”…  which was their Option B. Take a look at our Latest Example to see which one  you would consider in their circumstances?

 

I now took them through some emotional distancing , by taking a lunch break to talk about other things, while their minds subconsciously mulled over their chosen options. When they returned to their “pictogram,” their intuitions were primed to make their final choice. They went for option C – see the attached latest example.

We then created an action initiative, based upon this option, while things were still fresh in their minds, and they were good to go. When I followed up with them a week later, everything had gone according to plan except that a piano was left behind because it was too heavy and awkward to move. Their issue now was to find a way to get that moved before an end of month storage deadline.

We now discussed a new option solving dilemma, which we will deal with in 2 weeks time.

If you have an issue example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting in 2 weeks: “What is family’s best option for disposing of their stored piano?”  We’re always interested in your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger.)

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Helping a customer make an optimal decision: using Option Solving?”

Not so long ago, we heard about how a supplier and its customer were seeking to optimize their working relationship. There were a number of logistical and strategic reasons for doing this, but both sides were struggling with the best way for doing this to the customers optimal advantage.. It seemed appropriate to introduce them to the concept of option solving  to help resolve their decision dilemma. Once this approach became clear to both sides, they put together a small group of representatives from both parties to arrive at an optimal conclusion.

As a starting point, this bi-partisan group was challenged with coming up with the following rational question, “What could be the most convenient working relationship with customer ABC; considering local physical presence of supplier, the most cost effective approach,  the scale of its needs,  and building an exceptional relationship for the long haul?” Quite a few other considerations surfaced, but the intention was to keep it to around 50% of the entire list so as not to  over-complicate the picture.

Now the group’s question was ready, it was encouraged to consider appropriate Yin and Yang “bookends”; so as to challenge its thinking and to set outer extremities on its options. Its bookends turned out to be: “Leave customer to own devices,” at one end, with, “Build a full-time presence at customer” at the other. Look at our Latest Example to see why these were unlikely options.

 

With this framework in place, it was challenged to produce at least five plausible customer options through the use of its intuitive capabilities. (Note: By producing at least five, the team would sufficiently challenge its combined creativity  to determine a whole range of possibilities.)  One of its options was: “Strategic exercise incorporating both parties to align synergies “…  which was its Option E. Take a look at our Latest Example to see which one  you would consider in the circumstances?

 

It was now encouraged to utilize some emotional distancing  before it made its final choice. This would not only call on its collective wisdom to make an optimal selection, but also create some space for each participant to use their intuition to consider the group’s “pictogram” and compare it to untold experiences retained in each person’s mind.

After an hour of doing other unrelated things, the group returned to revisit its “pictogram,” make and display their choices, and then denote the most favorable one. With this in hand, the bi-partisan group made an overall selection and then put together an action initiative for customer ABC while things were still fresh in their minds.

If you have an issue example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting in 2 weeks: “What is a families best storage option?”  We’re always interested in your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger.)

“How can an executive get her sales team to take their group to the next level for 2016: using Option Solving?”

Fairly recently, this blogger was talking with a sales executive about her team’s intentions for 2016. We’re already into the fall season and so wise companies are giving serious thoughts to their intentions for the next year. This gives them time to include and discuss intentions with their team, so as to draw upon collective wisdom as well as encourage their people to buy-into desirable future objectives and outcomes. Since this transition doesn’t occur overnight, it is usually smart to have a dialog somewhat in advance, to help team members internalize their participation.

Since she was unfamiliar with the concept of option solving , it was prudent to brief her on the approach and related advantages. She would then use our session materials with her sales team as a practical example, as well as preparing her for this important task.  At some point, she was challenged with coming up with the following rational question, What are our best options to take our sales organization to the next level in 2016, considering we achieved 15% growth during 2015, we will introduce a new product in 2016,  we intend to add more business developers next year,  and we intend to increase the level of sales professionalism?” There were several other considerations but the intention was to keep it to around 50% of the entire list. The intention is always not to  over-complicate the picture.

Once her question was ready, she was encouraged to consider appropriate Yin and Yang “bookends”; so as to stimulate her thinking and to set outer extremities on her team’s options. Her bookends were as follows: “Remain growth rate as is,” at one end, with, “Triple in sales” at the other. Our Latest Example indicates why these were unlikely options.

 

She now had the framework for producing at least five plausible options for her team to contemplate utilizing its intuitive capabilities. (Note: We need at least five, so as to sufficiently challenge our creativity by producing a whole range of possibilities.)  One of her options was: “Increase level of new business by 20%; especially with new product  “…  which was her Option A. An option F was left open for her team to come up with any further option (s) that might intrigue its members. You can again view this in our Latest Example. Which one would you consider in the circumstances?

 

Although she clearly had her own preference, she was fully intent on sharing this pictogram with her team and hearing members out before going firm on anything. She was encouraged to utilize some emotional distancing with the team, before they made their final choice. This would allow their collective wisdom to make an optimal choice.

When that choice was made she would now work with the team to come up with appropriate initiatives to bring that choice to reality. She would experience great commitment through involving them, since they would feel fully in the picture as to why the decision was made.

If you have an issue example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.

Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting in 2 weeks: “Helping a client to make the best decision?”  We’re always interested in your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger.)