Career Decisions, Once More: using Option Solving

Over a recent lunch I found myself talking to a senior executive about his next career move. He has done a stellar job with his present company over the past five years, but now felt it was time for him to move on to something else…although wasn’t quite sure what that was to be. We naturally turned to looking at all his options. Once we got the ball rolling, we went back to first base for Option Solving which is to devise an appropriate question
Cutting straight to the chase, this question turned out to be: “What will be my optimum career option going forward: considering that I desire doing something fresh and different, I feel that I’ve little more to contribute where I am, I enjoy doing deals, I have some interest in mentoring, and that I’ve grown in leadership and business wisdom?” There were other important considerations but these five were the most important ones..Ultimately they help the intuitive judgment to put things properly into perspective.
We then set about creating two bookends to sharpen his intuitive mind for figuring out the best options available. These bookends were: at one end “Walk out tomorrow with little fore-thought on the future,” as the Yin, while the Yang at the other end was: “Make an orderly, early retirement to travel and write a book .” The reasons why these extreme options were unacceptable are indicated in our Latest Example. His mind was now primed to seek out the most likely, realistic options.
I explained that it was important for him to produce at least five options; as a way of stretching his intuitive senses to come up with every reasonable possibility. In this case, he eventually came up with six, with always the possibility for him to add others before deciding. One that he was likely to favor was: “Mentor own son in his own desired venture + pursue my hobbies “…Option F. The five other considered options are shown: again with the possibility of adding others.
With this pictogram in place, with or without his extra options, I advised him to allow some time for emotional distancing. I encouraged him to sleep on it, since it was such an important decision. He should look at the pictogram before he goes to sleep and then revisit it as soon as he wakes-up. Whatever option his mind focuses on should be his choice. His enormous intuitive mind will have scanned overnight all prior similar experiences in his life and will indicate which is the best choice for him. He should stick with that choice, despite any reservations, since that’s the one his instinctive judgment is most comfortable with. He can then work through the related issues.
Emotional distancing allows the enormous power of the intuitive mind to subconsciously mull over the pictogram, since it prefers interpreting pictures, to relate his given options to all prior similar experiences. Maybe you can see another option or know which way you would go? Once he’s made that choice, it’s strongly recommended that he figure out an action initiative immediately, while all the issues are to the forefront of his mind..
If you have an option solving example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.
Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting in 2 weeks: “What is our best option for Board Strategic activities?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger.)

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Career Decisions Again: using Option Solving

A family friend recently found himself wondering what his next career step would be because, after 3 years of study, where he got a masters degree in law, he didn’t succeed with his bar exam. The bar is high, so he has to decide whether to take it again in the Spring or return to his family and settle into a career. Since family circumstances have changed at home, the sooner he puts himself somewhat at their disposal and brings in some sort of income, it will put their minds at rest.
It was now time to make use of option solving, so as to come up with an optimum career solution. Since he had already read the book: ‘Smart Decisions: Goodbye Options, Hello Options,” he was aware of the initial need to develop an appropriate question to prime his “brain tissue.” This question came out to be: “What will be my optimum career possibility; considering I have to take my bar exam again, I already have a masters law degree, It’s time to move ahead with my career, there are several possibilities from where I am today, and family circumstances have changed in recent times?” The considerations were important to properly frame the question and only the key ones are shown here..
He then knew he had to create two bookends to prime his intuitive mind for figuring out the best possibilities. His chosen bookends were: at one end “Sit back and enjoy life until the right situation comes along,” as the Yin, while the Yang at the other end was: “Pursue education for a totally different career.” The reasons why these extreme options were unacceptable are indicated in our Latest Example. He was now ready to seek out the most realistic but creative options.
It was important for him to produce at least five options; as a way of stretching his intuitive senses to come up with every reasonable possibility. In this case, he came up with five, but left himself room to determine at least one other option over night. One of those he produced was: “Seek a position in corporate counsel’s office (or non-profit equivalent) and then use as a stepping stone into other corporate positions “…Option C. The four other considered options are shown, with one open item (F) should he arrive at any additional option.
Once his full pictogram is in place, with or without his extra F option, he should allow time for emotional distancing. Emotional distancing will allow him time to distance himself from the pictogram, turn to some other project for a while, and then revisit it to make his final choice. This ED could be for 10-20 minutes or he could sleep on it, again, overnight.
Emotional distancing allows the enormous power of the intuitive mind to subconsciously mull over the pictogram, since it prefers interpreting pictures, to relate his given options to all prior similar experiences. Maybe you can see another option or know which way you would go?
Once he’s made that choice, it’s strongly recommended that he figure out an action initiative immediately while all the issues are at the forefront of his mind. It will also spur him to move ahead rather than second-guess himself. The latter could prove career fatal.
If you have an option solving example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.
Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting in 2 weeks: “Career decisions, once more!” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger.)

Running effective Board meetings: using Option Solving

On participating in a recent sub-group meeting of an international board, it became clear that board Members had a range of possibilities in running their meetings more effectively. Whatever solution they arrived at, they would have to attain wider member endorsement as well as convince their time-strapped colleagues that any future meetings would be more content and time-effective.

I put together a paper outlining some options I thought may be of interest to this sub-group for them to consider once back at home. Subsequently, I thought it might be helpful to them, as well as other thousands of Board members out there, to view it as an option solving exercise. Option Solving can prove highly useful when solving tough dilemmas because it allows participants to utilize their highly powerful intuitive capabilities. (NOTE: Our natural intuitive abilities are natures gift for making the right calls.)

The first step toward making the right choice is to utilize our rational minds in coming up with the right question. The right question enables the effective challenging of our natural intuitive capabilities to come up with an appropriate choice. The question I chose, for their consideration, was as follows, which you can view in our Latest Example, was: “What will be our best alternative to running our Board more effectively; considering that our Board Members are not comfortable with our current approach, they don’t have the advantage of regular face-to-face meetings to negotiate an optimal approach, there’s a strong desire among Members to find a more effective means, and the Board is small enough to reach a reasonable consensus?” I came up with more than the four considerations given, but these seemed like the most important ones. It is important to show the right considerations to help frame the issue properly.

Once I had this question in place, it was time to develop two bookends (find out more about these from the book). The most likely bookends seemed to be: 1) Pursue a freewheeling meeting approach, as the Yin, and then the Yang at the other end 2) Start from scratch to devise a completely different meeting approach. The idea behind bookends is to choose extreme options that are least likely to be acceptable, so they prompt our minds to come up with the most realistic but creative options.

Once I put these bookends into place, I aimed to produce at least five options; as a way of stretching me to come up with a good range of options. By looking at our latest example, you will see that one option is to: “Pursue competence focused Operations and Strategic meetings”…Option D. Four other considered options are there, as well as an open item for group members to come up with their own additional option(s).

When the group members take a look at this and add any other appropriate options, without debating whether any of them should be there or not – since the option solving technique honors all suggested options, so as to spur new ideas and encourage people to participate – then they should allow time for emotional distancing. Emotional distancing allows them to step away from the pictogram completely and turn to something else. This could be for 10-20 minutes or sleep on it overnight.

Emotional distancing allows the enormous power of the intuitive mind to subconsciously mull over the pictogram, since it prefers interpreting pictures, to relate the given options to all prior similar experiences. When Group participants return to the pictogram, after their emotional distancing break, they will be drawn to one of the options. Group members should then share their choice.

Whichever item gets the most votes should be the choice of the group, unless there are other mitigating factors. They should then draw up an immediate action initiative for that chosen option, while everything is fresh within their thinking, and move forward accordingly. Maybe you have your own choice?

If you have an option solving example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.
Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting in 2 weeks: “Career decisions, again!” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger.)