Peel the Onion: Best career move – Option B – Pursue a fresh career related to the aviation industry: using Option Solving

In our last blog, we helped a client whose son was striving to generate a fresh career direction and we worked up a potential option solving solution of six alternatives. We understand that his son chose to pursue Option B: Pursue a fresh career related to the aviation industry. To make the most of his son’s choice, it seemed appropriate to pursue a Peeling the Onion exercise: to gain further insight on the best track within that industry.

They thus spent new time going through another round of option solving centered on Option B. Hence we produced a new question that looked like this: “What is my best alternative to move my career in an optimal direction: Option B – Pursue a fresh career related to the aviation industry; considering 1) I have a successful background in the aviation industry, 2) it’s important to find an enlightened outfit, 3) that I can make an valuable contribution, and 4) I cannot relocate for the time being?” These turned out to be his son’s four subsequent considerations based upon a new question, despite several other possibilities, so as to make his related decision outcome that much easier to handle.

We then determined that his current two yin and yang “bookends” remain as outlier possibilities. These would aid focusing his son’s intuitive, decision-making mind on his most realistic options. Bookends such as these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus. We are mostly unaware of how powerfully valuable but foot-loose our intuition can be unless properly focused.   

Again, these two bookends turned out to be: “Let it happen when it will,” although time was not on his son’s side, and “Engage a career counselor,” where the expense may be out of range: so both of which were his least likely options for the reasons given. Even so, they would provide his intuitive mind the challenge it needed to kick-start his most creative sub-options and eventually help draw-out his son’s most realistic sub-sub-option – see our Latest Worked Example.

Again, we went beyond the minimum of five – to six – reasonable alternatives, so as to stretch his son’s range of sub-options as much as possible. Once he has picked that channel, where he should absolutely follow his first major instincts, he can then either put together a gameplan for that sub-option or Peel the Onion once more: to gain even greater clarity on his best career track, right now. In career choice activities like this, a further Peeling the Onion may be the right solution.

But first his son had to contemplate our first Peeling the Onion effort, since he may wish to adjust it. Then he would need to set some time aside for emotional distancing – a form of objective thinking – before making his choice…perhaps after 2 hours, later that day, or first thing the following morning.

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “2nd Peeling the Onion: What is my best alternative for moving my career in an optimal direction- after Option B: Fresh career related to the aviation industry… (?)?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

What is my best alternative to move my career in an optimal direction: using Option Solving

A client was recently talking about his son’s career woes and was wondering about the best advice he could offer him. We both agreed that it would be best for him to find his own way, although giving him decent advice on how best to find his way was worthwhile to pursue.  That’s where option solving came in handy once more, although it would need a more unusual approach. This is because his son’s career field of view was somewhat open and therefore required extra steps to discern his son’s likely optimal way forward. So we decided to take the first step on his son’s behalf, to create an interest point, and then involve his son from there.

Our first step was to clarify his general career track before deciding how best to approach that career track. Hence we produced a question that looked like this: “What is my best alternative to move my career in an optimal direction; considering I need to 1) be somewhat flexible relative to my experience, 2) find a likely enlightened leadership segment, 3) discern a career that matches my talents-expertise, and 4) cannot relocate for the time being?” These turned out to be the son’s four key considerations, despite several others, so his decision outcome will make final possibilities that much easier to handle.

We then determined two yin and yang “bookends” as outlier possibilities. These would aid focusing his son’s intuitive, decision-making mind on his most realistic options. Bookends such as these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus. We are mostly unaware of how powerfully valuable but foot-loose our intuition can be unless properly focused.   

After due consideration our proposed two bookends turned out to be: “Let it happen when it will,” although time was not on his son’s side, and “Engage a career counselor,” where the expense may be out of range: so both of which were his least likely options for the reasons given. Even so, such bookends would provide his intuitive mind the challenge it needed to kick-start the most creative options and help draw-out his son’s most realistic one – see our Latest Worked Example.

It was then up to us to produce at least five reasonable options, so as to stretch his son’s range of options as much as possible. In fact, we came up with a sixth option after further thought, too, which you can review in our worked example. Your editor was intrigued by all the options, right off the bat, so it was going to be interesting to see which career channel his friend’s son picks.

Once he has picked that channel, where he should absolutely follow his first major instincts, he can then utilize Peeling the Onion to determine how best to pursue that career channel. It may then be necessary for him to Peel the Onion a even another layer to refine his “approach strategy”: i.e. how to open the right doors within that career channel.

But first his son had to contemplate our initial OS effort, since he may wish to adjust it. Then he would need to set some time aside for emotional distancing – a form of objective thinking – before making his choice…perhaps after 2 hours, later that day, or first thing the following morning. Even so, once he has picked that channel, he should stick with it, despite the temptation to second guess himself: second guessing your intuition is not a wise thing to do, even though that channel may have its challenges. Once he’s made his initial selection, then he can go to step 2 – Peeling the Onion – with our assist, to determine an optimum strategy for pursuing that channel.

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “Peeling the Onion: What is my best alternative for moving my career in an optimal direction- Option (?)?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

Peeling the Onion: Celebrating an Important-Year, Family-Member Birthday – Option C: At home Party: using Option Solving

Our good friend decided to Peel the Onion with Option C – Have At Home Party – based on our last option solving exercise. With that he opted to figure out how he was going to handle that ‘At Home Party.’

Being now even more familiar with the option solving approach, he immediately got focused on the appropriate question, which was: “Peeling the Onion: What is the best way to celebrate an important life milestone birthday in New York City- Option C: At Home Party; considering 1) there will be many potential well-wishers, 2) have a limited budget, 3) after Labor Day date, and 4) restrict communication to conjour a surprise?” These turned out to be the key four key considerations, despite several others, so the outcome will make his final possibilities much easier to handle.

Again, he had to determine two yin and yang “bookends” as outlier possibilities. These would aid focusing his friend’s intuitive, decision-making mind on his most realistic options. Bookends such as these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus. We are mostly unaware of how powerfully valuable but foot-loose our intuition can be unless properly focused.   

After due thought his two bookends turned out to be: “Ask friends in building to help” and “Ask spouse to arrange herself”: both of which were his least likely options for the reasons given. Even so, such bookends would provide the challenge his intuitive mind needed to produce the most creative options and help draw-out his friend’s most realistic one – see our Latest Worked Example.

He fairly readily produced five reasonable options, so as to stretch his range of options as much as possible. In fact, he left it open to come up with a sixth option after further thought, which you can review in our worked example. Your editor favored one particular option, right off the bat; it was: “Option- D: Get help from daughter and home help,” for pretty obvious reasons in view of the considerations.

With his Peeling the Onion pictogram now in place, he was then encouraged to set some time aside for emotional distancing – a form of objective thinking – before making his  choice…perhaps after 2 hours, later that day, or first thing the following morning. He could then create an immediate action initiative while everything was still fresh in his mind.

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “What is my best alternative for taking care of media promotional needs?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

Celebrating an Important-Year, Family-Member Birthday: using Option Solving

A good friend was spending a good deal of time contemplating how he would celebrate his spouse’s forthcoming, important-year birthday: especially as his spouse had made a special effort the prior year putting together a surprise birthday for him. Living in New York City made the choices endless, although most of them would be quite pricey and he had a limited budget. Your editor explained that one of the key benefits of option solving was to work the “contemplation anxiety” out of his system, since it can arrest the wild fantasies, and more, that can spew from his intuitive mind when left unchecked. Needless to say, we plunged right into the using the technique.

Together in short order we produced the following question: “What is the best way to celebrate an important life milestone birthday in New York City; considering 1) there will be many potential well-wishers, 2) have a limited budget, 3) need to fix the right venue, and 4) restrict communication to conjour up a surprise?” These turned out to be the key four considerations, despite several others, so it will make his final possibilities easier to handle.

They then had to determine two yin and yang “bookends” as outlier possibilities. These would aid focusing his friend’s intuitive, decision-making mind on his most realistic options. Bookends such as these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus. We are mostly unaware of how powerfully valuable but foot-loose our intuition can be unless properly focused.   

Our joint efforts created two bookends as follows: “Make it a small family affair” and “Bring your own food party”: both of which were his least likely options for the reasons given. Even so, such bookends would provide the challenge his intuitive mind needed to produce creative options and help draw-out his friend’s most realistic one – see our Latest Worked Example.

Working closely together, we derived at least five reasonable options, so as to stretch his range of options as much as possible. In fact, he came up with six reasonable options to exhaust his intuitive faculties, which you can review in our example. Your editor favored one particular option, right off the bat; it was: “Option- C: At home party- buffet style,” for pretty obvious reasons in view of the considerations.

With his friend’s “pictogram” now in place, he was then encouraged to set some time aside for emotional distancing – a form of objective thinking – before making his  choice…perhaps after 2 hours, later that day, or first thing the following morning. Whatever that choice, he could then decide whether to “Peel the Onion,” in order to expand the number of sub-insights on how to move forward, or create an immediate action initiative while everything was still fresh in his

mind. He chose the latter, which we will review in our next option solving edition.

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “Peeling the Onion: What is our optimum way to celebrate an important family birthday – Option C?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

What is my best option to help celebrate Mother’s Day: using Option Solving

Your editor found himself chatting with a client the other day, who was deliberating about his involvement on Mothers’ Day:  bearing in mind he has two grown-up sons living in two far apart cities. Bearing in mind that weekend is ripe for peak airfares, it wasn’t possible to get the whole family together; notwith-standing there are other partners involved, too. Another factor that came into the picture was how he had a strong relation with one, but a more strained one with the other so had to tip-toe around arrangements.  It then seemed appropriate to raise the possibility of option solving to review his choices.

Together we fairly readily came up with the following question: “What is my best option to celebrate Mothers’ Day; considering 1) there will be two separate celebrations owing to sons in different cities, 2) sons should take charge of celebrations, 3) spread expense over two events, and 4) different son personality quirks to contend with?” These turned out to be the top four considerations, despite several others, so it will make his final conclusions easier to deal with.

Next they had to produce two yin and yang “bookends” as outlier possibilities. These would aid focusing the client’s intuitive, decision-making mind on his most realistic options. Bookends such as these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus. We are mostly unaware of how powerfully valuable but foot-loose our intuition can be unless properly focused.   

Our combined efforts created two bookends as follows: “Just let things happen” and “Make it an open check book for them”: both of which were his least likely options for the reasons given. Even so, these bookends would provide the challenge to his intuitive senses, which can be quite creative, to consider the client’s options and draw-out his most realistic one – see our Latest Worked Example.

We then worked together to produce at least five reasonable options, so as to stretch his range of possibilities as much as possible. In fact, he came up with six reasonable options, which you can review in our example. Your editor favored an option, off the bat; it was: “Option- A: Let sons decide venues within reason,” as their father –my client – was likely to be paying all or part of the bills.

With their “pictogram” now in place, the client was then encouraged to set some time aside for emotional distancing – a form of objective thinking – before making his  choice…perhaps after 2 hours, later that day, or first thing the following morning. Whatever that choice, he could then decide whether to “Peel the Onion,” in order to expand the number of sub-insights on how to move forward, or create an immediate action initiative while everything was still fresh in his mind. He chose the latter.

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “What is our optimum way to celebrate an important family birthday?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

What is my optimum possibility to make contact with an elusive expert resource: using Option Solving?

We’ve all experienced this: where we have built an important relationship with a certain resource and then they become elusive. A friend was recently sharing such an experience the other week, so your editor introduced him to option solving as a means of uncovering his optimum option.

He was initially encouraged to come up with the following question: “What is my optimum possibility to make contact with an elusive expert resource; considering 1) we had dealings in the past, 2) person may be personally overloaded, 3) there may be hidden issues, and 4) it’s in my best interest to make the connection?” By pursuing these top four considerations, despite several others, it will reduce undue decision-making issues when he draws any final conclusions.

It didn’t take him too long to come up with his optimum question, so then he set-about creating two yin and yang “bookends” as outlier possibilities, he felt it would help focus his intuitive, decision-making mind on his most realistic options. Bookends such as these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus. We are mostly unaware of how powerfully valuable but foot-loose our intuition can be unless effectively focused.   

His two bookends came out as: “Just sleep on it until the time is right” and “Send him/her a tempting bribe”: both of which were his least likely options for the reasons given. Even so, these bookends would challenge our option solver to consider and produce his most realistic options – see our Latest Worked Example.

He was then challenged to produce at least five reasonable options, so as to stretch his range of possibilities as much as possible. In fact, he came up with six reasonable options and you can view them as an example. Your editors favored option, off the bat, was: “Option- D: Speak with friend/person’s leader to get a referred assist?”

With this “pictogram” now in place, he was then encouraged to set some time aside for emotional distancing – a form of objective thinking – before making any choice…perhaps after 2 hours, later that day, or first thing the following morning. Whatever that choice, he could then decide whether to “Peel the Onion,” in order to expand the number of sub-insights on how to move forward, or create an immediate action initiative while everything was still fresh in his mind. He chose the latter.

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the

COMMENTS  area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “What is my best option to help celebrate Mother’s Day?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

What is our optimum option for expanding our market presence: using Option Solving?

At a fairly recent client retreat the participants agreed that one of their company’s key priorities should be to expand its market presence. A pair of participants agreed to put some thought into this and come up with an optimum strategy to pursue the issue. After the fact, your editor started to give his own thoughts to this issue as a segue into sharing them with this pair when the occasion arose. He naturally decided to take an option solving approach.

Your editor subsequently came up with the following question: “What is the optimum way to expand our market presence; considering 1) we have excellent standing within our marketplace, 2) we are always eager to grow our business, 3) we have great products and people, and 4) we have a strong and ambitious leadership team?” By pursuing these top four considerations, despite several others, it will reduce undue decision-making issues in drawing any final conclusions.

Once he had put this question into place, where he then created two yin and yang “bookends” as outlier possibilities, he felt it would help focus his client’s intuitive, decision-making mind on their most realistic options. Bookends such as these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus. We are mostly unaware of how powerfully valuable but foot-loose our intuition can be unless effectively focused.   

These two bookends turned out to be: “Keep going as we are” and “Request major marketing investment from parent company”: both of which were his client’s least likely options for the reasons given. Even so, these bookends would challenge the client to consider and produce their most realistic options – see our Latest Worked Example.

He then set about, on his client’s behalf, producing at least five reasonable options, so as to stretch their range of possibilities as much as possible. He left it open for the client to produce a sixth option (F), at some point after the retreat, to give them an opportunity to make an additional suggestion(s). Such an activity would help it build “buy-in” and commitment. Your editors favored option, off the bat, was: “Option- A: Conduct comprehensive review of current marketing materials and upgrade where necessary?”

With this “pictogram” now in place, the client could then set some time aside for emotional distancing – a form of objective thinking – before making any choice…perhaps after 2 hours, later that day, or first thing the following morning. Whatever that choice, they could then decide whether to “Peel the Onion,” in order to expand the number of sub-insights on how to move forward, or create an immediate action initiative while everything was still fresh in their mind.

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “What is my optimum possibility to make contact with an elusive expert resource?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

What is our optimum possibility for bringing fresh talent up to full-speed?

A recent client discussion revealed one of her ongoing challenges, based upon her inclination to recruit inexperienced talent into her group and then orient and develop them into productive team members. She’s had a fair amount of success in doing that so far. However, she’s also had the experience of these young recruits joining with a decent education and expecting to progress as quickly as possible. Not only is this unrealistic, since there’s a lot to learn, but it also impacts morale within her team, if people are leaving to grab higher positions and income…even if they realistically don’t warrant it.

Your editor felt it was appropriate for the client to reconsider her hiring approach so as to give hirees a more realistic career view, at the time of hiring, which would put their aspirations into perspective. So we came up with the following question: “What is our optimum possibility for bringing fresh talent up to full-speed; considering 1) we don’t fully understand their potential at the outset, 2) we only wish to invest in them if they’re likely to stay, 3) we have to manage their career impatience, and 4) we need to develop a steady pipeline of talent within our growing company?” By sticking with these top four considerations, despite several others, it will reduce undue complications in any final conclusion.

After putting this question into place, we then created two yin and yang “bookends” as outlier possibilities, since they would help focus the client’s intuitive, decision-making mind on his most realistic options. Bookends such as these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus. We are mostly unaware of how powerfully valuable but foot-loose our intuition can be unless effectively focused.   

These two bookends turned out to be: “Let them find their own way” and “Send them on 2 year MBA course”: both of which were the client’s least likely options for the reasons given. Even so, these bookends would challenge the client to consider and produce their most realistic options – see our Latest Worked Example.

This positioned the client to come-up with at least five reasonable options, so as to stretch her range of possibilities as much as possible. They left it open for the client to produce a sixth option (F), after the initial session, so as to give her an opportunity to make an additional suggestion(s). Such an activity would help build her “buy-in” and commitment. Your editors favored option, off the bat, was: “Option- D: Create role staircase for them – new recruits – to scale, learn from, and gain practical experience?”

With this “pictogram” now in place, the client could then set some time aside for emotional distancing – a form of objective thinking – before making any choice…perhaps after 2 hours, later that day, or first thing the following morning. Whatever that choice, she could then decide whether to further “Peel the Onion,” in order to give them additional sub-insights on how to move forward, or create an immediate action initiative while everything was still fresh in her mind.

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “What is our optimum option for expanding our market presence?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

What is our best option to optimize our Receivables, without switching our company from an ‘outside-in’ to an ‘inside-out’ mode: using Option Solving?

Something probably every growing organization experiences at some point is a crunch moment in their cash flow and receivables. Now they have to figure out how they will deal with this crunch and try and prevent it from happening again. Fortunately their forecast in revenues is strong owing to their growth picture; it’s just a question of getting it onto the balance sheet. It means a lot of belt-tightening, good bank relations, and some clever cash management during the meantime. Your editor was witness to a recent client situation.

Before jumping into any advice, your writer decided to go through the option solving exercise to see if any new bright ideas would emerge. He posed the following question: “What is our best option for optimizing Receivables w/o switching company culture from an ‘outside-in’ to  an ‘inside-out’ mode ; considering 1) our inadequate Receivables are inhibiting expansion efforts, 2) we don’t have an adequate Receivables strategy, 3) there is insufficient Receivable awareness within our company, and 4) we are excited about our growth prospects?” He restricted himself to these top four considerations, despite several others, so as not to further complicate any final conclusion.

Having now put this question in place, he then created two yin and yang “bookends” as outlier possibilities, since they would help focus his intuitive, decision-making mind on his client’s most realistic options. Bookends such as these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus. We are mostly unaware at how powerfully valuable but foot-loose our intuition can be unless effectively focused.   

These turned out to be: “Do our best without overly bothering our clients” and “Provide a lot of incentives to improve”: both of which were his least likely options for the reasons given. Even so, these bookends would challenge his client to consider and produce their most realistic options – see our Latest Worked Example.

Now he had the challenge of creating at least five reasonable options, so as to stretch his range of possibilities as much as possible. Since he intended to share this with his client, he left a sixth option (F) open so as to give them an opportunity to make their own suggestion(s). Such an activity would help build their “buy-in” and commitment. His favored option, off the bat, was: “Option- C: 3 month emergency Receivable program – w/positive reinforcement… then?”

With this “pictogram” now in place, he would now be able to share it with his client and get their participation and buy-in. Then they could set some time aside for emotional distancing – a form of objective thinking – before making any choice…perhaps after 2 hours, later that day, or first thing the following morning. Whatever that choice, they could then decide to further “Peel the Onion,” in order to give them additional sub-insights on how to move forward, or create an immediate action initiative while everything was still fresh in their minds.

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “What is our best option for bringing fresh talent up to speed?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)

Peeling the Onion: What is my best approach for developing an internal-extended sales team: Option B – Contact each Region Leader (RL) to determine what is best prospect for Pilot Effort: using Option Solving?

From our example two weeks ago, the client decided he would go for option B as indicated above, through the Peeling the Onion approach.  This would require him to enlist the voluntary support of one of his Regional Leaders (RLs) to take a pilot approach.

His natural, lead-in question, to figure out his best sub-option, came through as follows: “Option B – Contact each RL to determine which is best prospect for Pilot Effort; considering 1) need to outline Pilot effort, 2) will need good existing rapport with RLs, 3) will need full support of VP Operations, and 4) will need to prepare RLs for ‘if not chosen’?” He restricted himself to these top four considerations, despite several others, so as not to further complicate his final decision.

With this question now ready, he then produced two yin and yang “bookends” as outlier possibilities, since they would help focus his intuitive, decision-making mind on his most realistic options. Bookends such as these are vital for preventing people’s fertile intuitive minds from wandering and losing focus. We are mostly unaware at how powerfully valuable but foot-loose our intuition can be unless effectively focused.   

These turned out to be: “Just pick RL and then go-for-it” and “Offer big financial carrot to lucky RL volunteer”: both of which were his least likely sub-possibilities for the reasons given. Even so, these bookends would challenge him to consider and produce his most realistic sub-options – see our Latest Worked Example.

He was then challenged to produce at least five realistic sub-options, so as to stretch his range of sub-possibilities as much as possible. Since he intended to share this with his President, he left a sixth sub-option open so as to give her an opportunity to make a suggestion. Such an activity would help build her “buy-in” and commitment. His favored option, off the bat, was: “Option- BB: Put together creative presentation for all RLs –let them nominate volunteer region.”

With this “sub-pictogram” now in place, he would be able to review it with his President and get her participation and buy-in. Then they could set some time aside for emotional distancing – a form of objective thinking – before making any choice…perhaps after 2 hours, later that day, or first thing the following morning. Whatever that choice, they could then decide to further “Peel the Onion,” in order to give them additional sub-sub-insights on how to move forward.

Alternatively, he could decide to put together an optimum action initiative based upon his initial option choice and now his sub-option choice. What option would you have chosen?

If you have an example of your own, please share it with this blogger, through the COMMENTS area.  Thanks Option Solving. (NOTE: Next posting will be in two week’s time: “What is our best option choice to optimize Receivables, without switching our company from an ‘outside-in’ to an ‘inside-out mode?” Let’s have your COMMENTS or go to peter@ileadershipsolutions.com to connect with the blogger. Also consider buying the book: “Smart Decisions: Goodbye Problems, Hello Options” through amazon.com)